Sun May 14, 2023
20:30

5/8erl in Ehr’n & Jazzorchester Vorarlberg 'Im Auge des Schmetterling' (A)

5/8erl in Ehr’n
Max Gaier, Bobby Slivovsky: vocals

Miki Liebermann: guitar

Clemens Wenger: keyboards, accordion

Hanibal Scheutz: bass

Jazzorchester Vorarlberg

Martin Franz, Isabella Lingg, Klaus Peter: reeds

Martin Eberle, Anton Meusburger: trumpet

Jan Ströhle: trombone

Thomas Halfer: trombone, tuba

Benny Omerzell: keyboards

Christian Eberle: drums

We start the live-stream (real time, stream is not on demand!) about 1/2 h before the show starts. By clicking on "Now Live" a window opens, where you can watch the concert free of charge and without any registration. If you want, you can support this project with "Pay as you wish". Thank you & welcome to the real & virtual club!

Welcome to an East-West meeting of a special kind!

5/8erl in Ehr'n is one of the most successful bands from Vienna in recent years, which has created its own genre with Viennese soul: Inimitable two-part vocals with extraordinary - and often extraordinarily beautiful - lyrics. Dreamy excursions into the "wide country", as Schnitzler already called soul, and edgy irony from everyday life in Austria. Delicate, butterfly-wing-like ballads and fast-paced grooves - everything is possible here.

The music of the Achterln has always been influenced by soul, funk and reggae; but in the magnificent setting of this program it takes on an additional stunning energy, powerful yet playful, light as a feather yet supported by weighty sound.

The Jazzorchester Vorarlberg, a contemporary formation in the classical big band tradition, takes the 5/8erl-Voices into its midst and styles their hair with rich blowing.

By the way, the bands are almost the same age:
In 2005, trumpeter Martin Eberle (Kompost 3, 5K HD, etc.) founded the Jazzorchester Vorarlberg together with saxophonist Martin Franz. A year later, 5/8erl in Ehr'n came together in Vienna.

The instrumental trio of the Achterln Liebermann-Scheutz-Wenger joined forces with drummer Christian Eberle and keyboardist Benny Omerzell to form an irresistible new whole. With Omerzell and Wenger, there are two keyboard wizards at work.
The arrangements are more than mere large-scale orchestral expansions; rather, they lend the pieces one or another new dimension, when a glistening brass section flashes between the thirds of the two-part singing, when ecstatic solos underscore (or even counteract!) what has just been sung, when newly composed instrumental interludes tell their own stories.

How nice that in these meager times such lushly cast programs are possible! (Albert Hosp, Radio Ö1 / Festival Glatt&Verkehrt)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)